Search movies

Typing something do you want to search. Exam: Movie Name, Actor, Release Year, Director...
if you want to find exactly, Please input keywords with double-quote or using multi keywords. Exam: "Keyword 1" "Keyword 2"

Time Bandits

Time Bandits

Genders: Adventure, Comedy, Family, Sci-Fi, Fantasy

Director: Terry Gilliam

Writer: Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam

Actors: Sean Connery, Shelley Duvall, John Cleese, Katherine Helmond

Year: 1981
Run time: 1h 50min
IMDB score: 6.9
Updated: 2 years ago

Movie infomation

Movie name: Time Bandits

Genders: Adventure, Comedy, Family, Sci-Fi, Fantasy

Imdb Score: 6.9

Runtime: 1h 50min

Released: 06 Nov 1981

Director: Terry Gilliam

Writer: Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam

Actors: Sean Connery, Shelley Duvall, John Cleese, Katherine Helmond

Company: Paramount Home Video

Imdb Link

Time Bandits Available Subtitles

Arabic subtitles Time Bandits2 years ago
Dutch subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Portuguese subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
English subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
French subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Chinese subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Greek subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Brazilian Portuguese subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Croatian subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Spanish subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago
Dutch subtitles Time Bandits4 years ago

Trailer


Review

It's a wavelength thing

5/10 It IS a wavelength thing. Terry Gilliam's films are ALL Terry Gilliam films. They all have that certain something, some kind of feeling about them that makes them instantly recognizable. The same can be said of the Coen brothers. Unfortunately, movies that are that personal and unique do not work for everybody. For the people that just can't get into Gilliam films, I hope there's another filmmaker that inspires childlike wonderment in you. Because it's a great feeling. Time Bandits is magic. I've seen it many times (over 10) and each time, I find something new about it. It's a fine example of a movie that works for children and adults alike. When I saw it for the first time at age 8, I enjoyed the fantasy, adventure, and basic good vs. evil story. As I got older I started appreciating the social commentary on consumerism, the Python-esque humor, and just how imaginative and skillfully done the movie is. After watching it again yesterday, I'm having trouble deciding which is the better movie; Brazil or Time Bandits.

4 years ago

God's "employees" off for a bit of white collar crime.

5/10 A terrific little fantasy that, not surprisingly, has flavors of Monty Python. My children and I first saw it in the early '80s on a night ferry from Harwich to Zeebrugge. I've seen it a few times since, and marvel at the creativity that went into the film. God's "employees" trying to use a map of the universe to track down treasure is the theme; running around through time trying to find the treasure is the game. The cameos by Cleese, Connery and the rest are some amusing highlights, but the Time Bandits themselves really make the story. The climactic scenes with the Evil Genius made me think more than a little of the Sorcerer's Apprentice.

I think it is a well done bit of fantasy for older children and adults; it helps to know a bit of history going into it. I wouldn't let my six-year old granddaughter see it -- at least not yet -- but she and her sister probably will love the adventure in a few years.

4 years ago

A wonderful work of imagination.

5/10 How's this for a zany plot? A bunch of mischievious dwarves steal a map from the Supreme Being which shows them how to find holes that lead to various historical periods. One such hole brings them out in a small boy's bedroom. The boy joins them, and together they visit diverse lands such as Napoleonic France; Sherwood Forest during the days of Robin Hood; the Titanic; the Middle East during the reign of Agamemnon; etc. Oh yes, and all the time they are being pursued by the Devil (referred to here as "Evil"), who would dearly love to steal the map for himself.

Time Bandits is an outlandish, often hilarious, always engaging fantasy story with a magical cast. It wins over the audience by offering them a refreshingly unique story, and littering it with memorable episodes which vary in tone from hilarious to frightening, from historical to mythological. Lots of energetic performances add to the fun, with Ian Holm doing a superb Napoleon, Sean Connery an imposing Agamemnon, and Ralph Richardson a delightfully eccentric Supreme Being. The film's peculiar ending used to upset me as a youngster, but now I appreciate its ingenuity and it evokes in me memories of a famous Philip Larkin poem which begins with the infamous line: "They f*** you up your mum and dad, they may not mean to but they do.......".

Time Bandits is a triumph of imagination. It isn't quite flawless, due to a
bland performance by Craig Warnock as the boy and a somewhat dismal episode featuring an angry ogre, but flaws aside it is certainly one of those films with which it is always a pleasure to while away a couple of hours.

4 years ago

Masterful fantasy, in the purest form

9/10 Finding Terry Gilliam's "Time Bandits" in the bargain bin at the local movie store was too good a deal for me to pass up, and I'm so glad I didn't! This movie is probably one of the greatest modern-day fantasies I've seen, due primarily to the amazing vision of Gilliam. I was disappointed with it on my first viewing years ago, expecting a rehash of Monty Python material, but yesterday watching it I just couldn't stop grinning. This movie knows its sources, and sends them up right.

For starters, I love how Gilliam handled the boy 'hero' in "Bandits". He's not anyone spectacular, aside from an active imagination (over and above his banal parents), and he really doesn't contribute much to the story-it simply passes him by. Most of the other characters don't like him that much even. (the "stinking Kevin" line just makes me howl!) He's also not that cute, which is a rarity with child actors and which sinks most films with them. Plus, the danger of the story doesn't stop at him, as shown by the rather sobering finale. No 'It's all a dream' type cop-out here. Having studied the form of the fantasy as explained by Tolkien myself, Gilliam obviously understands how it works.

Of course, because it works, "Time Bandits" is just plain fun. The plot's out of nowhere-just kind of trips along through time and space and stranger things. Napoleon as a height-obsessed drunkard? Robin Hood as the aloof, unlikely leader of a band of violent, too-merry men? Agamemnon as the ideal father figure? It's all here, plus the technocratic, pyromaniac "Evil" vs. the Supreme Being. Ah, you always knew He was an staid Englishman in a pinstripe suit, didn't you? ("Dead? No excuse for laying off work.")

Perhaps it's not Gilliam's masterpiece, as "Brazil" could be argued for that...though one could also argue "Time Bandits" gives a bleaker perspective through the contrast of the fun and whimsy. If our reality is depressing now, and Kevin's was, is the fulfillment of our fantasies any better? Perhaps Randall said it best himself - "Heroes, bah! What do they know about an honest day's work?" :-)

4 years ago

A magical journey you don't ever want to end

5/10 I was lucky enough to see this piece of celluloid magic on the big screen when it first came out. I'm glad I did, too, because the shoe-box multiplexes that were being slapped together couldn't do this movie justice. Terry Gilliam hits just the right note when he introduces Kevin, a ten-year old with big appetite for western mythology(you get the impression that in another year, he'll be reading Joseph Campbell and Rider Haggard)and an even bigger imagination. Having parents of the most sterile, materialistic bent(plastic couch covers--ecch)just ensure his receptiveness to the adventures that follow his falling through the time-door in the back of his closet with Randall and his fellow dwarves as they plunder and loot their way through time and history. Gilliam pokes fun at some of history's figures, like Napoleon("That's what I like to see--little things hitting each other!"), Robin Hood("was it really necessary to hit him?""Yes boss.""Ah, I see."),and others. Gilliams' lesson that having lots of stuff will not ensure happiness and that usually, the journey itself is reward enough is artfully told without flogging the audience with it. Something else that stuck with me, but I didn't realize until long afterwards, were the things that Kevin discovered, after a fashion, in his adventures but didn't have in his life back in the 'burbs: a real father figure, played by Sean Connery as Agamemnon, and true love, as presented by Peter Vaughan and Katherine Helmond as Mr. and Mrs. Ogre. Plus the special effects are economically impressive without being too cheesy(my god--the fortress of ultimate darkness WAS made of lego blocks!). In the end, though, it was something that I find far, far too rarely in movies now and before, and it occured to me after I had seen, of all things, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon". What Ang Lee's film had in common with Gilliam is simply this: they both had the feel of a great big story that you came in the middle of, and you didn't want ever to end, but it didn't matter, because the structure was such that you had enough to digest for now. And I can count on less than two hands the movies where I was left with THAT wonderful feeling.

4 years ago