Search movies

Typing something do you want to search. Exam: Movie Name, Actor, Release Year, Director...
if you want to find exactly, Please input keywords with double-quote or using multi keywords. Exam: "Keyword 1" "Keyword 2"

Dirty Wars

Dirty Wars

Genders: Crime, Drama, Documentary

Director: Rick Rowley

Writer: David Riker, Jeremy Scahill

Actors: Nasser Al Aulaqi, Saleha Al Aulaqi, Muqbal Al Kazemi, Abdul Rahman Barman

Year: 2013
Run time: 87min
IMDB score: 7.4
Updated: one year ago

Movie infomation

Movie name: Dirty Wars

Genders: Crime, Drama, Documentary

Imdb Score: 7.4

Runtime: 87min

Released: 18 Oct 2013

Director: Rick Rowley

Writer: David Riker, Jeremy Scahill

Actors: Nasser Al Aulaqi, Saleha Al Aulaqi, Muqbal Al Kazemi, Abdul Rahman Barman

Company: IFC Films

OfficialWebsite

Imdb Link

Dirty Wars Available Subtitles

Spanish subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Chinese subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Croatian subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Chinese subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Greek subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
French subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
French subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
French subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
English subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Brazilian Portuguese subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Romanian subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Arabic subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Spanish subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
Swedish subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
English subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago
English subtitles Dirty Warsone year ago

Trailer


Review

Courageous attempt

10/10 Finally someone brave enough to uncover US war crimes against innocent people. Jeremy Scahill and his team did a great job for humanity despite facing a lot of difficulties. i believe every one who has heart and some humanity left in him/her will be influenced by the movie and try to understand what US and other governments around the world are killing and torturing innocent civilians specially Muslims and covering up their crimes by just using a disguise instrument of terrorism and national security concerns. Those so called patriots denying that their government could do such a thing should consider themselves in the condition of victims who are killed every single night by US. There should be global moment to make US, NATO and puppet government held responsible for what they are doing.

one year ago

Investigative journalism at its finest

8/10 "Yet we seemingly tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity and our claims to civilization alike. We calmly accept newspaper reports of civilian slaughter in far-off lands." Robert F Kennedy

Although it seems America may be pulling out of Afghanistan next year, Special Operations units have been steadily and secretly increasing their military footprint around the rest of the world in places like Yemen and Somalia. Consequently, today's wars are being fought in our name in foreign lands completely under the public radar. In light of recent revelations regarding the government's massive domestic surveillance program and the DOJ's record amount of prosecutions against whistleblowers, one might reasonably argue that this is the least transparent administration in our nation's history. The Obama administration's attempts to sanitize war by shrouding it behind a cloak of government secrecy ultimately serve to keep American citizens in the dark about what is really going on. War is by nature dirty, however, and it is the very knowledge that war comes with huge costs and sacrifices that acts as a check on our aggressive impulses. By bringing the hidden truths about these military night raids and drone strikes into the light, "Dirty Wars" makes a compelling argument about why you should care that we have been a nation at perpetual war since 9/11.

Originally, the film was supposed to focus solely on the story of the buildup of JSOC itself, but the filmmakers made a good decision to expand the scope of the documentary to include more about the man who helped to expose the story. Jeremy Scahill, a sedulous investigative reporter for The Nation magazine, is an interesting figure who stands apart in today's age of feckless news media and the increasingly moribund state of investigative journalism although it would have been interesting to learn more about what drives a man like Scahill to go into Taliban country with nothing more than a camera, a notepad, and a bulletproof vest.

After watching the film, I thought of the late Roger Ebert's film review of a 2003 film about another intrepid investigative journalist, Veronica Guerin, who died while exposing a powerful syndicate of drug dealers in Dublin. In his review of the film, Roger Ebert wrote rather disapprovingly, "Disturbed by the sight of gangs selling drugs to children and teenagers in the Dublin of the 1990s, she began a high-profile, even reckless campaign to expose them. Was she surprised when her campaign ended with her own murder? She must have been, or she would have gone about it differently. That she struck a great blow against the Irish drug traffic is without doubt, but perhaps she could have done so and still survived to raise her son."

I don't know how Ebert would have felt about Scahill, but there is a chilling scene in the movie where Jay Leno asks Scahill with surprising bluntness, "How are you still alive?" That we need people like Guerin and Scahill today is without question. But that our appreciation for their work is also balanced out of concern for their well-being is an even sadder reflection of the type of dangerous world we live in.

The most powerful aspect of the film is the way it humanizes the victims of American violence by giving us faces, names, and stories to connect with the dead. The term "collateral damage" is a military euphemism for civilian casualties. In the newspapers that report on these Special Operations night raids and drone strikes, which have been happening with increasing frequency the last few years, we are only told the number of dead. Even worse, we are told that all military age males who are killed in drone strikes, whether they were intended targets or not, are automatically categorized as militants. In a particularly stomach churning performance of spin doctoring, a DoD spokesperson rationalizes the deaths of pregnant women and children by reassuring us that they COULD have been militants.

To those who respond, "Well this is war. This is what happens in war," the film poses an important question: What is the ultimate end goal of all this bloodshed? What have we accomplished in our last 10+ years at war if it has only engendered more enemies around the globe. In the film, it would be comic if it weren't so tragic when a former intelligence officer states that what started out as a kill list of 50 names at the beginning of the war has grown into several thousands.

The film succeeds in presenting complex issues without moralizing, and finds the right balance between veracity and entertainment. The movie does seem to stretch and play up material sometimes for false suspense and dramatic effect, although I found the insight into the changing nature of warfare to be its most interesting and primary aspect. (This itself might not be news to people who read the news regularly, thanks in large part to the work of journalists like Scahill.) But the film's greatest achievement is how it raises these important questions about who we are and where we are headed as a nation.

For a country in which more people die by motor vehicle accidents and gun violence every year than have ever died from terrorist attacks, how did we come to a state of endless war? Are we a nation that values human rights or not? Are we a nation that values due process or condones assassination of our citizens? Are we a nation that abides by the constitution or not? And will Americans who speak out against these gross abuses of power become suspect in the eyes of their own government, or are they doing what all citizens should be doing by actively engaging in our democratic process?

one year ago

Why aren't more people watching this film?

10/10 I watched this film at home yesterday. It opened my eyes and broke my heart. I didn't realize the United States of America has hired War Lords in Somalia, on our pay roll. I didn't realize the raids and mass killings in other countries where we are not currently at war with. I didn't realize we killed an innocent young teen just because he might grow up to be a threat (wtf). This film opened my eyes and I haven't been able to get it off my brain since watching it. I don't understand how the USA is getting away with committing crimes against humanity. This kill list they have keeps growing and at anytime your name could be put on it. It keeps growing and growing and there is no end in sight. Watch the film, have a your friends and family watch this film. Everybody needs to watch!

one year ago

Why isn't this being more widely reported?

9/10 A courageous film that brings the truth of America's war crimes to our movie screens. Pregnant women murdered in Afghanistan shot to death by US special forces in their own home. Innocent villagers in Yemen blown to pieces by US cluster bombs. Somali warlords paid by the United States government to kill foreigners. Meanwhile, young Americans celebrate outside the White House after the President announces that a man has been in his own home.

It would be hard for anyone to watch this movie with dry eyes, but how can an American sleep at night after seeing the murders our tax dollars are funding and elected officials are ordering? Hopefully this movie will spark a national outrage against America's crimes against humanity and bring America's military aggression to an end once and for all.

one year ago

Amazing Documentary

10/10 The documentary covers the story of Jeremy Scahill's discovery of a secret war, without bounds, which the US government has been waging in the name of fighting terrorism.

We see Scahill travel the world interviewing families in Iraq, Jordan, Yemin and Samalia who have had family members killed when they were declared to be suspected terrorists.

I left the theatre feeling that it is one of the best documentaries I have ever seen.

I was lucky enough to catch a screening of this at the Seattle International Film Festival, where Scahill did a Q+A afterwards. He was extremely eloquent answering every question.

one year ago